If you’re an Android user, and especially a Samsung Galaxy owner, you’ll want to check out the Galaxy Buds. They’ll work with any Android phone and even iPhones, mind you, but Samsung users get an easier pairing process (just open the case while it’s near your phone) and a proprietary high-quality audio codec. Even without those perks, the Galaxy Buds are impressive at their affordable price point. Samsung tapped AKG’s sound expertise to tune the drivers with a balanced sound profile. They won’t replace a pair of studio monitors, but our reviewers say the Galaxy Buds will produce a pleasant result that you can further tweak using EQ presets in the companion app.

The trade-off is that most wire-free earphones have inferior battery life compared with tethered models, forcing you to pop them in their charging case fairly often. Their small size also means on-earphone controls are generally limited, and their price is usually significantly more than similar tethered wireless earphones. Our reviews go into greater detail about these benefits and limitations, and highlight how certain models are starting to overcome these growing pains.

With no cable coming between you and your favorite tracks, Sennheiser’s top-notch wireless headphones will be sure to satisfy everyone, even the most demanding audio connoisseurs. While lossless digital RF-transmission is perfect for high-end home stereo use, Bluetooth®-equipped models work great with mobile devices. Reliable and easy to handle, Sennheiser’s wireless headphones really unleash the joy of sound.
Sennheiser certainly took its time getting into the true wireless market, but if you’ve got a hefty spending budget, you’ll find it was well worth the wait. The Momentum True Wireless offer impressive features like transparency mode to pipe in the sound around you, IPX4 splash-proofing (though we wish they were fully waterproof at this price), and most importantly, audio performance that outdoes everything we’ve heard in the segment.

The biggest advantage that the Powerbeats Pro has over the competition is its ability to connect quickly to Apple gear. (Beats is owned by Apple, in case you didn’t know.) Since these earbuds are equipped with the same H1 chip as the Apple AirPods, they pair with Apple devices nearly instantly. Simply open the case next to your iPhone, and an icon asking if you’d like to connect appears on the phone screen. Tap, and you’re good to go. If you are signed in to your iCloud account, the Powerbeats Pro also automatically appears in all of the Bluetooth menus on your various Apple devices, so you need to pair to only one device. You can also use these earbuds with non-Apple devices, but in that case you need to pair them to each device individually. Switching from one device to another is a process similar to that of other Bluetooth earbuds or headphones.


You are eligible for a full refund if no ShippingPass-eligible orders have been placed. You cannot receive a refund if you have placed a ShippingPass-eligible order. In this case, the Customer Care team will remove your account from auto-renewal to ensure you are not charged for an additional year and you can continue to use the subscription until the end of your subscription term.
Beats includes four sizes of silicone ear tips, so most people will be able to get a good seal. However, the tip material is rather thin, so it tends to crinkle in the ear canal when you first put in the earbuds or adjust them. These also aren’t the most isolating of the earbuds we’ve tested, so you should keep an eye on the volume level when commuting by train; you may also want to select another pair of headphones for in-flight use, such as the 1More Dual Driver BT ANC In-Ear Headphones.
Surprisingly, many of these wire-free models can be used at the gym and even get wet, despite the fact that each earpiece has an exposed charging contact on the inside. Check the IP rating of these; some workout-friendly earphones are only IPX4-rated, so they can stand up to sweat but might be hard to wash. Others are IPX7-rated, which means they can survive getting rinsed and dunked.
Active noise cancellation uses outward-facing microphones to pick up and analyze noise, which then gets canceled out by circuitry that generates an inverse wave in the headphones. It was previously an expensive, cumbersome technology that couldn't be found on wireless headphones, but that changed a few years ago with advances in battery life and circuit miniaturization. You'll pay a premium for headphones with active noise cancellation, but it's a handy feature if you just want to tune out everything around you besides your music. For more, check out the best noise-cancelling headphones.
You get an awesome 6.5 hours of listening time between trips to the included charging case, with three full charges in the case meaning that you’ll get up to 26 hours of playback before you need to hunt for the micro USB cable. Unfortunately, there’s no way to control volume levels — not an uncommon omission on some true wireless earbuds — and the built-in mics can’t be used to pass through external sounds, which is a handy feature especially when jogging through busy intersections. These are not deal-breakers by any means but are definitely worth keeping in mind.
This is a look at the top wireless headphones we've tested overall, regardless of price. As such, many of the options here fall in the $100 and up range. That doesn't mean you need to spend a lot of money to get headphones that deliver quality audio. If you're shopping on a budget, head over to best headphones under $50 for plenty of great options that won't break the bank.

Although the Cambridge Audio Melomania 1 pair sounded good and came with a neat optional silicone carry sleeve for the charging case, we had difficulty getting the tips to seal, and the control buttons clicked loudly in our ears when we pressed them. The Melomania 1 also produced a noticeable latency delay that made watching videos on a device less enjoyable.
When we were running our tests, we noticed that, if we had no audio playing for a long while but kept the Elite 75t in transparency mode, the sound being piped in from the world around us would occasionally flutter off and on rapidly when our connected devices played a notification tone. The phenomenon lasted only a second or so and didn’t occur when music was playing or when we were on a call; as such, we weren’t overly troubled by it. However, since it wasn’t a problem we experienced with the Elite 65t, we think it shouldn’t be happening at all. We reached out to Jabra, and we will update here if the company offers a firmware revision that addresses the issue.
This is a look at the top wireless headphones we've tested overall, regardless of price. As such, many of the options here fall in the $100 and up range. That doesn't mean you need to spend a lot of money to get headphones that deliver quality audio. If you're shopping on a budget, head over to best headphones under $50 for plenty of great options that won't break the bank.

Master & Dynamic MW07 Go: This pair offers a lot of positives. The earbuds are very comfortable and stable in the ears, and we like the separate volume and track controls, although the volume buttons are a tad small for those with larger fingers. The 10-hour battery life and 30-meter Bluetooth range are impressive for this category. The small fabric-wrapped case and the earbuds themselves feel well made. However, although the sound was rather good in our tests, the bass was boosted in a way that could veil male vocals on bass-heavy songs. And we wished the Go had a transparency mode so we didn’t need to take these earbuds out to have a conversation. But if those aren’t dealbreakers for you and you aren’t turned off by the $200 price, they’re solid earbuds.
Beats includes four sizes of silicone ear tips, so most people will be able to get a good seal. However, the tip material is rather thin, so it tends to crinkle in the ear canal when you first put in the earbuds or adjust them. These also aren’t the most isolating of the earbuds we’ve tested, so you should keep an eye on the volume level when commuting by train; you may also want to select another pair of headphones for in-flight use, such as the 1More Dual Driver BT ANC In-Ear Headphones.
Audio-Technica has announced two new sets of true wireless earbuds: the Audio-Technica ATH-CK3TW and the Audio-Technica ATH-CKS5TW. The CK3TW offers six hours of battery life per charge, with an additional 24 hours of juice in the case, and is expected to be priced at $100. The CKS5TW promises 15 hours of battery life per full charge, with an additional 30 hours in the charging case, and features aptX, SBC, and AAC compatibility; that pair costs $170.
We love the Jabra Elite 75t wireless earbuds because they deliver the best combination of performance and features for the money—and they’re delightful to use. Their diminutive size makes them both comfortable and discreet, the controls are painless (literally and figuratively), they offer approximately a full workday of battery life per charge, and they sound great with music and phone calls.
Wireless headphones are ideal for hardworking employees who need to handle client calls while organizing files and preparing documents. Bluetooth headphones also work well for employees in the construction field and workers who spend the day in a warehouse. Hands-free headphones help make the workplace safer because there are no stray cords to catch on supplies or cause employees to trip and fall. We have wireless headphones for your office or factory available from many reputable companies, including Kinivo, Sennheiser, Sony, and Motorola.
If you’re more of a talker than a jammer, the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 5100 should make you (and your caller) happy. It has four noise-canceling microphones. That alone is nothing revolutionary for headsets, but the company claims its WindSmart technology automatically detects and filters wind. And while there’s no noise cancelation, the cone-shaped ear tips should do a decent job of blocking out moderate levels of noise, and there are multiple options for those in the box.
×