If you have the money and are prepared to spend it, then invest in Shure SE535 Sound Isolating In-Ear Stereo Headphones. The brand carries a highly respected reputation when it comes to audio quality — no other company compares. The SE535 delivers high-definition sound and a powerful bass that’s unmatched. The secret? The earphones contain one tweeter and two subwoofers in each bud, creating a bold, rounded sound that other products can’t deliver. It also features noise-canceling capabilities, blocking out up to 37 dB of background noise.
If you’re still using the earbuds that came with your phone or other gadget, you may want to consider an upgrade. You have a lot choices these days: from tiny, in-ear models that will slip into a shirt pocket to big, over-the-ear models that can help immerse you in the music and make you look (and maybe even feel!) like a DJ. And some models skip wires altogether, leaving nothing but air between you and your music.
Jabra engineers audio products almost exclusively, so it should come as no surprise that its Elite 75t earbuds rank among the best in wireless. There are lots of reasons to like the Jabra Elite 75t. They don’t sound the absolute best, but you may come to love Jabra’s punchy sound signature that bumps the bass just enough for a dance break. And there’s more, including 7.5 hours of battery life, a remarkable figure at their moderate size. The charging case can get you another 28 hours, with 15 minutes of USB-C charging being all you need for an hour’s worth of listening.
Traditionally, Beats headphones are known for their bass-heavy sound quality, which can range from “a bit much” to “completely overwhelming.” However, Beats has comparatively reined in the lows on the Powerbeats Pro, and this pair sounded pretty darn great in our tests. Are they completely neutral and authentic? No, but we found the extra bass boost pleasant, and it didn’t blur or reverberate. Higher frequencies such as consonants and cymbals were clear and didn’t pierce in our tests, though audio purists could accuse them of lacking some sparkle or detail. The effect was similar to that of a solid set of speakers with the subwoofer bumped up a smidgen. If that’s something you like, you’ll love these wireless earbuds. Overall, we think the sound quality is as good as the Jabra set’s; it’s really a matter of preference. The Jabra earbuds give you the ability to adjust the EQ, whereas with this Beats pair, what you hear out of the box is what you get.

I'm not sure they sound quite as good as the Sony WF-1000XM3, but they certainly sound like premium true wireless earphones, with rich sound that includes powerful bass performance and lots of detail. Some people may have some quibbles over the fit -- I had to supply my own XL tips to get a tight seal and found the Anker's Soundcore Liberty Air 2 a little more comfortable -- but the Soundcore Liberty 2 Pro are a good value. They also work very well for making calls (they do a good job reducing background sound).  

Many times you’ll hear someone refer to a pair of headphones as having a “flat” or a “neutral” sound. Basically this means that the headphones are reproducing the signal they are receiving from the source device with as little deviation from it as possible. It may seem like this is something that you’d want all headphones to do, but there are reasons why most do not.
That said, the term earbuds has become synonymous with earphones and in-ear headphones, so the difference is ultimately academic. Whatever you call them and whatever they say on the box, you should look for earphones that form a good seal inside your ear with silicone or foam eartips. They'll sound much better than plastic-covered drivers cupped against your ear canal.
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